Dave Hahn on Remote Camera Triggering

We’re seeing more and more great work by photographers dusting off their old camera bodies and utilizing them to help cover more action via remote camera triggering. Particularly useful at sporting events, here’s another talented shooter, Dave Hahn, getting different angles for his photojournalism business, CSI Photo in the New York metro area.

We previously covered Dave’s remote camera triggering indoors. Check out all the outdoor images as Dave explains how he executes remote camera triggering in his own words.

©Dave Hahn

©Dave Hahn

Sure, one of the biggest features with PocketWizard Plus III Transceivers is the zones, but when you start looking at some of the additional features the transceivers pack into them, you’d be amazed!

Since you’ve upgraded your DSLR and your Rebel is now collecting dust, you may want to think a little differently. Remote cameras could be the way to go for you. PocketWizard has a couple of great transceivers to start you on your way.

First, there is the PlusX. This is an upgrade from the Plus II with six additional channels. The PlusX is an excellent choice to get you started, and priced just under 100 bucks. But before you dive in, you might want to consider the Plus III. Ed. note: The Plus III, with 32 channels and Quad-Zone triggering, was intended as a replacement to the Plus II. However, the PlusX is a good replacement, as well.

©Dave Hahn

©Dave Hahn

Some of the advantages of the Plus III’s include 32 channels (16 standard and yes, 16 with quad zone capabilities). Other functions include a (RP) Repeater Mode, (HSR) High Speed Receive Mode, (Tx Only) Transmit only, (Rx Only) Receive only. The one I’m going to discuss today is the (LR) Long Range Mode.

Sometimes you might be in a situation where you might not be all that close to where you are placing a remote camera. This is where the Long Range Mode comes into play.

Remotely-triggered camera shot, low angle. ©Dave Hahn

Remotely-triggered camera shot, low angle. ©Dave Hahn

What the LR Mode does is, in effect, double your maximum range between your transmitter and your receiver. Today, I was in a situation where I had my camera mounted on the ground. One of the disadvantages of having your camera right down on the ground is, well, it’s pretty darn uncomfortable laying down there and shooting up. The first thing I did was to mount my camera on what is called an fPlate. This lets me mount a ballhead and my PocketWizard right to it and be shooting from a more comfortable location, notably, with my spiffy new DSLR and some long glass.

Simultaneous shot taken with previous photo, uncropped. Note remote camera at bottom right. ©Dave Hahn

Simultaneous shot taken with previous photo, uncropped. Note remote camera at bottom right. ©Dave Hahn

In the picture you can see the Plus III mounted in the hotshoe of the camera. As I mentioned, you can mount the Plus III directly to the fPlate. But, in this case placing it in the hotshoe improved my range. Not only are you getting the same shots that you would normally get. But, adding that second camera not only keeps it happy but, you’ll get some shots from an angle youmight not have thought of in the past. One of the first things I do when I get to an event is look around and try to find that different angle, without tying myself to that one out of the way place.

So go ahead, dust off that extra body and look for that unique shot.

 

Information on fPlates can be found at their site and on Facebook. See more of Dave Hahn’s work at the CSI Photo site.

 

All images and quotes in this post are used with permission and ©Dave Hahn, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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