Dave Hahn Burst-Fires with the MultiMAX

Dave Hahn of New York’s CSI Photo has been covered on the PocketWizard blog previously. Known for his atypical but exciting camera angles used at sporting events, Hahn covers burst-firing in his own words.

Dave Hahn at work.

Dave Hahn at work.

Over the next few months I will be writing about a few of the differences between the PocketWizard MultiMAX transceiver and the Plus® III radio triggers. As you know the Plus III transceiver is packed with a host of great features for the advanced photographer. But, over the next few months I will be explaining some of the more advanced features of the MultiMAX transceivers for when you may want to step up your game.

In this review I am going to talk about how you can set the contact time of the MultiMAX. Why might you want or need to adjust the contact time of you transceiver? Let’s say you shooting sports, where you know where the action is going to be, such as basketball or maybe baseball. And you’re going to be using a camera as a remote from a location that you would not be able to check to see if you are getting the shot you want. Here is where adjusting the contact time would help. If you camera fires at five frames per second and you would like to shoot 3 frames each time you would simply set the contact time to 0.6 seconds. To adjust the contact time you would go into the menu of your receiving MultiMAX by pressing: MENU(*) B A and using the up and down keys to adjust the time.

How did I come up with 0.6 second to be the correct time for three shots? Simple math. To figure out how long to set the contact time for you would divide the number of shots by how many frames per second (fps) your camera is. # of shots/fps=contact time. In my case I am using a Canon 1D Mark2n which fires at 8 fps and I wanted to burst five frames each time. So, my contact time I set 5/8=0.625. Since you can only set the contact time in hundreds of seconds, I set my contact time to 0.63 (See Figure_1) and was able to consistently fire five shots each time I hit the test button.

Figure 1. ©Dave Hahn

Figure 1. ©Dave Hahn

Could you simply hold your test button down and get the same results? Sure you could but, in my case I want to only trip the camera five times. I future reviews I will explain why I am looking for a constant frame count each and every time. Using the contact time on the MultiMAX insures a constant frame count each and every time.

So, you may still be asking why would I want to use a remote. The simple answer is to capture a different angle. The best bet is to place a camera in a location the you simply cannot be.

Figure 2. ©Dave Hahn

Figure 2. ©Dave Hahn

Here in Figure 2 I have a camera mounted to the scoring tower at Pocono Raceway. The scoring tower is in a small island in between pit road and the race track. This is not a location that even credentialed photographers are allowed. And something like this requires approval well in advance.

Figure 3. ©Dave Hahn

Figure 3. ©Dave Hahn

In Figure 3 to get the same angle of my final shot this is the approximate location where I would need to be to capture the burn out with the grand view of Pocono Raceway, including the Spires on top of the grand stands. I didn’t want the scoring tower to beblocking the view of the grandstands or even possible the burn out. My final shot (Figure_4) was captured with the remote camera.

Figure 4. ©Dave Hahn

Figure 4. ©Dave Hahn

So, why do I choose burst, as opposed to just holding down the test button and firing away? In my case I usually have my hand full and am trying to get from standing somewhere on pit wall getting some images from one angle while my remote captures from a different angle and then running off to Victory Circle.

You can see more of Dave Hahn’s work at his site. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

 

All images and quotes in this post are used with permission and ©Dave Hahn, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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