Posts Tagged ‘how-to’

Jaleel King Defines His Moments

Screen Shot 2014-01-14 at 8.20.01 PMDefining moments are part of life and they typically arrive with little if any warning, and at any time, day or night. Jaleel King’s life-defining moment came to him at the age of eight in the form of an errant shotgun blast that left him in a wheelchair.

Fast-forward about 30 years and Jaleel still faces obstacles, though these days his obstacles have to do with not having the right lens on his camera when he needs it, or not being able to get high or low enough to get the angle just right. In other words, many of the obstacles Jaleel deals with on a workday basis are the same obstacles other photographers regularly deal with… minus the wheelchair.

Jadore Bleu was photographed using  Lighting AB800s in the back on slave with an AB800 with a beauty dish beauty dish as key synced to a PocketWizard FlexTT5  Camera: Canon 40D with PocketWizard MiniTT1.

Jadore Bleu was photographed using AlienBees B800s in the back on slave with an AlienBees B800 with a beauty dish as key synced to a PocketWizard FlexTT5 Transceiver.
Camera: Canon 40D with PocketWizard MiniTT1 radio trigger. © Jaleel King

 

 

 

 

 

 
Jaleel King’s work is a mix of street journalism, weddings, and studio portraiture that are striking to say the least, especially considering his journey to this point in his life. Take a browse through his website or Facebook page and you’ll discover a person who is hasn’t allowed a life-altering incident stop him from pursuing his love of photography. In the studio or in the street, Jaleel King has taken life by the gonads and run with it.

Portraits lit with a PCB - Einstein with a PocketWizard PowerMC2 unit inside of a Wescott 50" Apollo  and two Canon 600EX Speedlites synced to PocketWizard FlexTT5s Camera: Canon EOS 1D MK IV with PocketWizard MiniTT1 and AC3.

Portraits lit with a Paul C. Buff Einstein E640 flash with a PocketWizard PowerMC2 Receiver inside of a Wescott 50″ Apollo and two Canon 600EX Speedlites synced to PocketWizard FlexTT5 Transceivers.
Camera: Canon EOS 1D MK IV with PocketWizard MiniTT1 radio trigger and AC3 ZoneController. © Jaleel King

The idea of wireless flash always appealed to Jaleel King because as he puts it “wheelchairs and cables are a bad mix”. Initially self-taught, for a long time King was unaware of the existence of wireless flash. It wasn’t until he had an opportunity to be on set at a ‘real’ photo shoot that it all came together. For the first time he was able to see how equipment and trained talent can work together to create truly professional photographs. And in his particular case, knowing he could do away with cables – one of the banes of his photographic existence, was all he needed to hear.  From that moment on King knew this is what he wanted to do and nothing would stop him.

KP Morgan

© Jaleel King

Jaleel’s lighting system is a mixed bag. Being a Canon man, his system includes Canon 580EX II & 600EX-RT Speedlites, AlienBees B800s, Einstein E60′s, and an assortment of beauty dishes, reflectors, and umbrellas. Depending on the circumstances, his PocketWizard arsenal includes MiniTT1 Transmitters,  Flex TT5 Transceivers,  PowerMC2 Receivers, and AC3 ZoneControllers.

One of a series of portraits for HelpPortrait_2011. Lighting: Canon 580EXII Speedlites on background with PocketWizard FlexTT5. Main light is an Alien Bee 1600 inside a Wescott 24" Apollo with a PocketWizard FlexTT5 and an AC9. Camera: Canon EOS 1D MK IV with a PocketWizard MiniTT1 and an AC3.

One of a series of portraits for HelpPortrait_2011.
Lighting: Canon 580EX II Speedlites in background with PocketWizard FlexTT5′s. Main light is an AlienBees B1600 inside a Wescott 24″ Apollo with a PocketWizard FlexTT5 Transceiver and an AC9 AlienBees Adapter.
Camera: Canon EOS 1D MK IV with a PocketWizard MiniTT1 Transmitter and an AC3 ZoneController. © Jaleel King

Lamarr was photographed from 'the Rig' using a Lighting AB1600 with a standard reflector coupled to a PocketWizard FlexTT5 and an AC9. His Canon EOS 1D MK IV was coupled to a PocktWizard MiniTT1 and an AC3.

Lamarr was photographed from ‘the Rig’ using a
AlienBees B1600 with a standard reflector coupled to a PocketWizard FlexTT5 Transceiver and an AC9 AlienBees Adapter. His Canon EOS 1D MK IV was coupled to a PocktWizard MiniTT1 Transmitter and an AC3. © Jaleel King

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PocketWizard radios were not Jaleel’s first choice of remote triggers, but it didn’t take long to figure out why the pros all seemed to be using PocketWizards, and these days PocketWizard radios are the only brand he takes on assignment.

‘The RIG’ as Jaleel calls it, is essentially a rolling studio with a compact wireless lighting system Jaleel is currently piecing together. The way Jaleel describes it ” I originally thought it would be uber sweet to have a rolling studio so I can do some unique and experimental street work on my own with a light setup ready to go.

As a means of taking control of the light outdoors as easily as he does in the  studio, Jaleel is currently prototyping his 'Rig", a studio on wheels so-to-speak.

As a means of taking control of the light outdoors as easily as he does in the studio, Jaleel is currently prototyping his ‘Rig”, a studio on wheels so-to-speak. © Jaleel King

“With help from local camera shops, we came up with this Frankenstein contraption that I could attach to my wheelchair. It’s a Manfrotto boom stand with the legs taken off that is attached to my wheelchair with about 4 super clamps and a magic arm. For lighting I was using an AlienBees B1600 with a FlexTT5 Transceiver and an AC9 AlienBees Adapter.  I used an AC3 ZoneController to control the power output from my MiniTT1 Transmitter.  I used a Vagabond Mini to power my strobe.”

The RIG is a work in progress and Jaleel is in the midst of tweaking details having to do with weight distribution and not having enough surface area on the wheelchair to keep it from shifting as he moves about. These are minor issues he hopes to iron out soon and there’s little doubt
he will. Now if only he could figure out how to avoid getting the boom arm stuck in low-hanging branches life would be sweet.

 

To see more of Jaleel King’s work and/or contact him go to his Facebook page, his website, or email him at jaleel@jaleelking.com

All images, videos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and © Jaleel King, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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Dom Romney on the Road

We’ve looked at the exciting work of Dom Romney previously. It seems like his love of American cars remains undaunted. Here’s some very cool behind-the-scenes photos which accompany Dom’s story of how he got the final shot, in his own words.

©Dom Romney

©Dom Romney

This technique is fairly unusual. What you do is mount the camera to the car, roll the car along the road, and then—when it’s moving—trigger the camera with a long exposure to give the concept of moving with speed.

To create the illusion of speed is difficult. When I shoot, it’s normally just me and a driver. I have to push the car, so I use the PocketWizard to fire the camera while I’m busy pushing. Below is the unedited picture showing the rig, and also me pushing, to give a better idea of how its done.

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What’s that for, PocketWizard?

This month’s feature is basically a road map for HyperSync®.  Why a “road map?”  Because HyperSync, a tool that could be used for all kinds of genius photography, seems to attract wheels. Motorcyles and BMXBicycles. And more motorcycles. Last month I called it BikerSync®. Mark Wallace, a motorcycle guy himself, wheeled down the road less taken and rallied a grand tour Webinar on HyperSync.

Shooting Portraits with HyperSync.

Here is some information we sent out to viewers before the Webinar. The road goes ever on and on, down from the door where it began, but the trip is a little smoother if you have the key to your magic decoder ring.

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Wireless Because It’s Easier, Not Required

Scott Wyden Kivowitz is a New Jersey photographer sharing his passion for photography any way he can. Scott regularly hosts photowalks in New Jersey and loves educating other photographers on all aspects of the art. Scott is also the Community & Blog Wrangler at Photocrati and the Photographers SEO Community, teaching other photographers on how to increase business with their Web sites. What follows is Scott’s account of how he achieved a corporate portrait with limited time and physical room.

©Scott Wyden

For the most part, every time I have a photo session to do, I am using at least a pair of PocketWizard radio triggers. For example, if I am out and want to play with wireless flash photography at night, I will typically have a PocketWizard on camera and another firing off a flash. However, going wireless is not a requirement. Sure, photographers can still pick up a long PC cable to trigger their lights, especially when the session is in a studio. Wires can be hidden (sometimes) under rugs, backdrops, etc., but in the example you will see here, I used a pair of PocketWizard Plus II units not because I had to, but because it made the job easier.

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Matías Gálvez Tries Something New

Chilean photographer and student, Matías Gálvez, is a new disciple to the off-camera flash world. The combination of attention to detail and willingness to experiment he possesses, shines through in his photography. Here, he presents a playful and colorful shoot he did at a friend’s house.

Splash ©2012 Matías Gálvez

A while ago, I decided it was time to change my photography style and try something new. I’m not saying I didn’t like what I was doing, but to do a 180-degree turn would be refreshing. I decided to focus on my strobist skills on location.

When my new PocketWizard Plus III’s arrived from the U.S., I felt it was the perfect time to start experimenting.

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VIDEO: Moshe Zusman on Perfect Light

The talented and always-wonderful Moshe Zusman recently gave a lecture at B&H’s Event Space, demonstrating how to get perfect wedding shots, no matter what kind of lights you have or your location.

In order to get well-lit, white balanced subjects, Moshe recommends setting up a number of color-balancing gelled strobes that compliment the location’s lighting, high on light stands above the room. His assistants, he says, can set this up in six minutes.

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Nikon, Sekonic, and PocketWizard Control!

A comprehensive article has been published on controlling Nikon Speedlights with precision using PocketWizard FlexTT5MiniTT1, AC3 ZoneController, and a Sekonic L-758DR lightmeter with the RT-32CTL Radio Transmitter Module.

Author Dinil Abeygunawardane has posted a fascinating tutorial on the Visible Range Blog. It’s absolutely worth your time to read. The article details how to set up the above list of gear with Nikon Speedlights and dial in specific light values for different units remotely.

The radio trigger for the Sekonic works with the firmware update for the PocketWizards (at time of writing, still in beta) to make the whole process more convenient. As Dinil writes,”No more running up and down, lowering light stands or opening up soft boxes.” Photos of the lightmeter’s LCD and screenshots of PocketWizard Utility abound.

This is a great job and worth your time if you’re a Nikon shooter. Read the full step-by-step tutorial and check out the rest of Visible Range while you’re there.

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Location Lighting Workshops with Rick Friedman

Here’s an update on the Rick Friedman Location Lighting Workshops we’ve been hearing so many good things about. New dates below.

To learn about portable lighting techniques that have enabled Rick Friedman to capture his on location, award-winning imagery around the world, sign up and join in for one of his upcoming workshops. One of the key things that he will share in a “very hands-on way” is how to better control your lighting. This dynamic, intensive, interactive seminar is designed for portrait photographers, photojournalists, corporate and event photographers, wedding photographers, and serious amateurs who want to improve their knowledge of illumination and light. If you attend Rick’s class, you can plan on leaving feeling empowered to capture great images no matter what lighting situation you come up against!

This workshop begins with creating interesting light with one Speedlight, progresses through using multiple Speedlites with many different light modifiers, using grip equipment, adding colors to your images and ends with mixing both Speedlights and studio strobes. Rick teaches using both Nikon and Canon.

Workshop Schedule:

  • December 12th & 13th Calumet, San Francisco
  • December 16th &17th Calumet, LA
  • January 15th Unique Photo, Fairfield, NJ
  • February 11th & 12th Rick Friedman Studio, Boston
  • March 12th & 13th Midwest Photo, Columbus, OH
  • March 31st & April 1st Calumet, Cambridge, MA
  • April 6th & 7th Calumet, Chicago

Spring 2012:

  • Glazer’s Photo, Seattle
  • White House News Photographers Association, Washington, DC

Visit Calumet Location Lighting Workshops for info on “Location Lighting Workshop with Rick Friedman.” To see Rick’s work and read what other workshop attendees say about Rick’s workshops please visit his site.

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Chris Garrison on HyperSync

Photographer Chris Garrison has shared his thoughts on HyperSync technology with us. You can learn more about Chris and his work by visiting his site and his blog

HyperSync

IMAGE ACTION 5

1/800th at f/7.1.

HyperSync(TM) is the single largest game changer for photographers using studio-type flashes. As photographers, we are once again taking part in another evolution of our industry. I consider the introduction of HyperSync technology by PocketWizard to be as large as the digital format transition. We are no longer just freezing motion with shutter speed or light, we are actually painting light onto the frozen motion.

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PocketWizard Top Ten FAQ

Our TOP TEN most asked simple questions.

It’s understandable you might get into a situation while working with the MiniTT1® and FlexTT5® and today’s complex camera systems where you’re not sure why something isn’t working as you would expect it. Most of the time, there is a simple solution. We asked our tech support crew to give us the “Top Ten” questions consumers asked to keep their system working properly. Here they are

1. Q: Nothing is working! What should I do?

A: Try these steps:

  1. Check the batteries: weak batteries can cause strange behavior.
  2. Make sure all radios (and cameras and speedlights) are updated to the latest firmware. Try our beta firmware as it often has new fixes ready to be tried.
  3. Factory Reset the radios.
  4. Take your first shot at 1/125th so the system can properly calibrate timing.
  5. Wait about 3 seconds after turning on your radio before taking your first picture.
  6. Take your time! Whenever possible, compose the image with the shutter release half-pressed before taking the picture.
  7. Save your camera’s custom functions, reset the camera, then start adding them back in one at a time.

 

2. Q: In what order should I turn things on?

A: Top down: Flash, then radio, then camera. Wait 2-3 seconds between each step. Older Quick Guides may have this slightly different, but top down works for all current radios and firmware.

 

3. Q: My Nikon camera won’t let me choose a shutter speed faster than x-sync. How can I shoot at faster shutter speeds?

A: Nikon cameras require that FP-sync is enabled to shoot faster than x-sync if they detect a TTL-capable device in their hot shoe. Enabling FP-sync is done in the Custom Settings menu. Set “e1 flash sync speed” to 1/250s (Auto FP).

4. Q: The ISO on my remote Nikon Speedlight is stuck at 200. What’s wrong?

A: It isn’t required for TTL operation on the remote flash and has no effect on exposure so the radios do not transmit camera setting information like ISO to remote flashes.

 

5. Q: I set my speedlight to MASTER and stuck it on a remote FlexTT5. Why won’t it control other flashes when I have a MiniTT1 or FlexTT5 on my camera?

A: The ControlTL® system, just like Nikon and Canon native systems, expects the MASTER speedlight to be only at the camera position so “Remote MASTER” operation is not supported. You need a receiving FlexTT5 for each remote speedlight.

 

6. Q: My remote speedlights don’t change their zoom when I zoom the lens on my camera. What’s wrong?

A: Zoom tracking is a feature for on-camera flash and would cause some lighting issues if done on remotes. Nikon and Canon native systems do not have zoom tracking for remote or slave flashes either.

 

7. Q: How can I trigger a FlexTT5 from a PocketWizard module-equipped Sekonic meter?

A: This PW TV episode explains it all: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOOq3sX6Ki4

7b. Q: Will you ever have ControlTL in a Sekonic meter?

A: A module with the ControlTL channels is being developed. We do not have a release date for it at this time.

 

8. Q: What cable do I need?

A: You can use the Cable Finder at PocketWizard.com to find the right cable for lots of different cameras and flashes.

 

9. Q: Can I combine radio and optical so I don’t have to buy as many FlexTT5s? Can I connect more than one speedlight to a single FlexTT5?

A: Currently you need to have one FlexTT5 for each speedlight you want to control via radio.

 

10. Q: Is “xxxxxxx” brand/model flash compatible with your radios?

A: Some third party flashes are compatible with our radios – you can read more about our radios compatibility on their respective product pages (FlexTT5 for Canon, FlexTT5 for Nikon). Also, almost any flash can be used in Basic Trigger Mode for simple triggering operation.

Still have a question? See a list of our worldwide distributors, contact us by email, or visit the PocketWizard Wiki.

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