Posts Tagged ‘MiniTT1’

Making Waves, 30 August 2013

making_waves_logoChris Garrison
PocketWizard Blog reader-favorite Chris Garrison is still hot on the Red Bull scene. He put together a great post on a shoot combining the impossible, land and water sport figures together, featuring Terry Adams and Adam Errington. Packed with behind-the-scenes photos, two videos, and the whole story, don’t miss Chris Garrison and his PocketWizard FlexTT5 and PowerST4 pulling off the impossible. As always, get your fix of Chris Garrison at his site and blog.

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Don Toothaker Dancing with Creativity

Don Toothaker is a Massachusetts photographer who covers a wide range of subject matter. He also conducts classes at New England Photo Workshops. In his own words, Don was willing to take the time to address creativity, light, and how he executed the below photo.

©Don Toothaker

©Don Toothaker

Creativity is a powerful thing. As a photographer, too often I struggle with expressing myself from a different perspective. I know my camera equipment, I feel confident in my compositions, and I am secure photographing a variety of subjects but, despite all of that, creativity remains a personal nemesis.

Every Tuesday night my son takes hip-hop lessons at a local dance studio. The second story studio is large, but like many studios, is mostly bare. Sitting one night watching the class I was struck by the open expanse of the studio, the many windows, and one particular door. I loved the way light spilled into the room each time the door was opened. Looking at the door, the light, and the windows I was inspired to create a particular image. All I needed was a ballet dancer. All I needed was some creativity.

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Back to Basics with Off-Camera Flash

Now that we’ve covered HyperSync© and Remote Camera Triggering in our recent newsletters and blog posts, we’re going back to the basics by focusing on simple off-camera flash using the MiniTT1, FlexTT5 and AC3 ZoneController for both Canon and Nikon. The MiniTT1 and FlexTT5 radios allow you to take full advantage of the simplicity of TTL flash while taking your flash off the camera to improve your images. Add the AC3 ZoneController when using more than one off-camera flash for full creative control right from the camera. We’ve pulled together some existing content from our site which provides the basics of off-camera flash using PocketWizard ControlTL radios and accessories.

The following Behind the Scenes videos provide a quick overview of the MiniTT1, FlexTT5 and AC3 ZoneController in use by a variety of professional photographers.

Cliff Mautner provides a behind-the-scenes look of the MiniTT1, FlexTT5 and AC3 in action during a bridal shoot and gives a good overview of using the AC3 ZoneController in his work flow. The full story can be found here.

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Basic Vertical Photography with Nick Percell

© Nick Percell

© Nick Percell

Stephen Richert is one tough dude. In 2012, he embarked on a yearlong trip into the mountains of North America where he would climb everyday for 365 days all while managing his type 1 diabetes. The result was the nonprofit, LivingVertical. Nick Percell was the photographer on hand to capture Stephen’s inspiring journey. Here’s how he did it, in his own words.

This first image is actually the last day of Project 365. We were climbing in Red Rock Conservation Area in Las Vegas, Nevada and had to visit this climb everyday until Steve was able to complete it. I knew the lighting wasn’t in my favor as far as angle and intensity, so I knew I was going to need to haul some sort of lightweight lighting that I could use HSS with. I wanted to have a shallow depth of field, f/2.0, which meant I had to shoot at 1/4000s; this helped a bunch with bringing the ambient light down and allowing me to focus the image more on Steve. I took my MiniTT1 and FlexTT5 with me to use with my Canon 580EX II and 430EX II speedlights. Considering all the rigging and such I carry up to the climb (about 70 lbs.), I needed to keep my gear lightweight and reliable.

pocketwizard-nick-percell-bts

© Nick Percell

Once I found a place I could get the shot, I placed a 430EX II about 75 feet from me, slightly below the climber to fill in some of the harsh shadow under him. The second light (580EX II) I ran on top of the MiniTT1 to help balance his left side with the hard light coming from the subject’s back right.

The reliability of the wireless system is crucial here when I’m in a harness secured to the rock and it’s not easy to reach the flash.

This second image was shot about a month before in Zion National Park, Utah. Steve, his wife Stephanie, and I went out looking for new climbing areas in the park, which meant we had to do a bunch of hiking with gear as we looked. When Steve found this line up this face, I knew right away that I really wanted to feature the face of this large textured boulder. When shooting things like this, I really have to try and get what I want quick as he’s climbing with no rope and no pad on rock that’s fragile.

© Nick Percell

© Nick Percell

Again I brought my MiniTT1 and FlexTT5 to take care of the wireless communication. I used a 430EX II flash on both sides of the climber, the closest being about 10 feet to my camera on the ground and another about 125 feet away on a stand. I used the light closest to me as a broader source and the light on the stand zoomed in to 105mm on the subject. I really needed the power out of these lights so I stayed away from the HSS this time, but with the lighting I was still able to darken the sky enough to feature the face of the rock more.

© Nick Percell

© Nick Percell

This third image was taken in Joe’s Valley, a bouldering area outside of St. George, Utah. The boulder we chose to shoot on was almost completely overhanging, leaving it in darkness with the sun coming from camera right. I knew I wanted a better depth of field and I needed to create the majority of light with a battery powered system. I used just a single source because I liked how the shadow separated him from the surface of the rock. As he climbed over the edge of the rock, the sun caught his face and made it possible to bring the background down in intensity.

Connect with Nick Percell on flickr and 500px, catch up with Steve on LivingVertical.

 

All images and quotes in this post are used with permission and ©Nick Percell, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or re-post elsewhere without written permission.

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What’s that for, PocketWizard?

This month’s feature is basically a road map for HyperSync®.  Why a “road map?”  Because HyperSync, a tool that could be used for all kinds of genius photography, seems to attract wheels. Motorcyles and BMXBicycles. And more motorcycles. Last month I called it BikerSync®. Mark Wallace, a motorcycle guy himself, wheeled down the road less taken and rallied a grand tour Webinar on HyperSync.

Shooting Portraits with HyperSync.

Here is some information we sent out to viewers before the Webinar. The road goes ever on and on, down from the door where it began, but the trip is a little smoother if you have the key to your magic decoder ring.

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Garth Milan Overcomes Bright Midday Sun with HyperSync

©Garth Milan

©Garth Milan

For years we’ve been drawn to what photographer Garth Milan continues to do. Sponsored by Red Bull, among other corporations, Milan is a master at freezing the action of extreme sports of all kinds. We recently caught up with him again, and he was kind enough to explain how he overpowered the Southern California sun and stopped motion at the same time. Here is his account of his most recent shoot.

This particular shoot with Red Bull athlete Curtis Keene posed two fairly large problems. One was the bright Santa Monica midday sun, and the other was the fact the trails we shot on were miles away from the nearest parking spot, which meant we had to hike up the normally “downhill” trails with any and all gear needed for the shoot.

All that being said, my assistant and I started our blister-inducing hike up with a camera body and several lenses, along with an Elinchrom Ranger, equipped with the PowerST4 to enable my PocketWizard to HyperSync® at any and all speeds. After one of the most intense hikes of my life (considering how much gear we had), we arrived at our destination to find, just as I thought, the lighting was less than ideal for shooting with the natural, ambient light.

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Laura Barisonzi’s HyperSync Dance

We’ve been fans of Laura Barisonzi’s environmental portraits for years, and enjoy seeing what she’s up to at any given point in time. She has an ongoing personal project entitled Dance, and she took a few minutes out to share with our readers how she pulled off one of the images. Here’s a breakdown of the process for this shot in her own words.

An image from Laura Barisonzi's ongoing project, "Dance." ©Laura Barisonzi

An image from Laura Barisonzi’s ongoing project, “Dance.” ©Laura Barisonzi

I had scouted this alcove at a Manhattan park location up to a year before the shoot and had it in my head for a long time as somewhere for a dramatic shot. Once I began my personal project on dance, this location was at the top of my list for locations which could convey some of the formality of a theater or stage, but still have the grit and interest of being outside in an urban setting.

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PocketWizard Major ControlTL Firmware Update

Free update provides compatibility with several new cameras and dramatic improvements to HyperSync®, further removing the barrier to x-sync limitations. 

So. Burlington, VT – June 12, 2013 – LPA Design, manufacturers of PocketWizard Photo Products, the world leader in wireless control of cameras, flash lighting and light meters, announces today a major update to its ControlTL firmware for the MiniTT1®FlexTT5®PowerMC2 and PowerST4 radios and minor updates for the Plus® III and MultiMAX® radios.

The new ControlTL firmware (version details below) provides compatibility for several new Canon and Nikon cameras, greatly improves the performance of PocketWizard’s exclusive HyperSync feature and resolves bugs in previous versions. It is available now as a free download using the PocketWizard Utility and it is strongly recommended that all current owners of the MiniTT1, FlexTT5, PowerST4 and PowerMC2 update all their radios to the latest firmware for best performance. Any current owner of the ControlTL system can easily install this version via USB connection and update their PocketWizard radios for free. Complete details are available at the PocketWizard site here.

The new firmware includes complete compatibility for the Nikon D600 and D3200 cameras and manual power control compatibility for the Canon EOS 6D, EOS-1D X and EOS Rebel T4i cameras.

1081new_me.jpg

In addition to the new camera compatibility, this new firmware version offers significantly improved HyperSync flash performance. This exclusive feature offers photographers the ability to use studio flash well beyond their camera’s normal x-sync speed, for greatly expanded creative control.

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Portraits of Vermonters by Caleb Kenna

©Caleb Kenna

©Caleb Kenna

It’s always great to see a series of photographs which tell a story. Whether it’s photojournalism from a war-torn population to a series of fashion looks in an exotic locale, groups of photos with unifying themes make us feel and think differently than a single image can.

Caleb Kenna knows this, and presents a wonderful cross-section of Vermont residents. Known for their free-thinking, tenacity, self-reliance, and Yankee wit, the subjects Kenna has captured are more varied than famous son’s Robert Frost’s time, but are just as at home in the beautiful state they call their own. Here are some of his thoughts on this series.

©Caleb Kenna

©Caleb Kenna

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Matt Hill’s Paper Burlesque & Night Paper Project (NSFW)

My colleague Matt Hill has succeeded in fusing his two main artistic passions, night photography and cut paper art, in his ongoing project entitled Night Paper. It’s been exciting to watch him find the heart of this amalgamation, and even more exciting, it has culminated (for the time being) in a live art experiment in New York. Read his own account of the execution and find full details of how you can witness this in person below.

©Matt Hill

©Matt Hill

NIGHT PAPER is a personal project I started dreaming about over five years ago and began executing last July. It’s the combination of long exposures at night and surreal, hand-cut paper fashions. I live for playing with time-dialtion and by introducing portraiture at night, especially when they are only wearing paper, makes for a visually challenging combination of the practices. I’m constantly surprised by how well they blend and continue to evolve together. And, it must be said, all of these images are done in-camera. There are no composites in this series. Also, since this involves tasteful nudity in the context of fine art, you may want the NSFW warning if you are in the wrong place…

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