Posts Tagged ‘remote camera’

Up Close and Personal with IED Detection Dogs

© Tammy Hineline

© Tammy Hineline

Sgt. Tammy K. Hineline has been enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps as Combat Camera since 2008. Now serving in Afghanistan, Tammy recently got the opportunity to document the training of some IED detection dogs and to “hang out with some rockin’ dogs and hardworking handlers.”

For the shoot, Tammy decided to go for an unconventional angle that would showcase the dogs at work and give her the chance to try out her new PocketWizard Plus III’s. Her account of the shoot follows.

When photographing Doc, one of the IED Detection Dogs with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, I was fortunately able to plan individual shots accordingly. It’s not often that I have the time for extensive pre-visualization, but with training bumpers spread up and down the road for the dogs to retrieve and bring back to their handlers, I was able to spend the time I needed to get the shot right.

The PocketWizard Plus III was perfect for this shot, as I wanted to get a worms eye view but my presence at the camera would have distracted the dog from his task. I also didn’t want to lie in a ditch full of rocks that day. So with the PocketWizard being used as a remote trigger using a CM-N3-ACC cable, and my favorite Canon 16-35mm lens, I was able to set up the shot.

Because I had the bumper to focus on, I set my focus point and left it so I wouldn’t have to worry about any auto-focus adjustments when the moment came.

© Tammy Hineline

© Tammy Hineline

This image was taken at 1/800, f/11, and ISO 200. (more…)

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Remote Cameras Behind Home Plate with the Los Angeles Angels

© Matt Brown

© Matt Brown

Over on The Halo Way, the official photo blog of the Los Angeles Angels, photographer Jordan Murph has put together an educational post on how he and team photographer Matt Brown use remote cameras during games and what you’ll need to set one up yourself.

Why use a remote camera for sports photography? Lots of reasons! “They provide us with different angles from our hand held cameras in case we get blocked,” Jordan writes, “and they can give a unique view from a location that is impossible to physically photograph from, or they can just provide extra coverage.”

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