'Plus III' Category

Paul Souders + PocketWizard radios + Grizzlies = Awesome

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© Paul Souders

Paul Souders’ grandmother wasn’t a woman of means per se, but she did manage to squirrel away enough scratch every year to fly off to someplace she’d never been before. Watching her slide shows was Paul Souders’ introduction to, and some may say addiction to, travel photography. Fast-forward to ‘adulthood’ and upteen journeys to places previously unknown to him – camera at side – has become Paul’s Souders’ ticket to ride.

A few years back while taking stock of all of the pictures he’d taken on previous journeys, Souders came to realize his awesome 600mm close-ups of bears, lions, and wildebeests were as awesome as everybody else’s awesome 600mm photographs of bears, lions, and wildebeests. Considering how much time, effort, and money (personal money no less!) went into his work, he started reassessing his approach to photography, and how to redefine the word ‘awesome’ on an upcoming trip to Kenya.

His solution was to have his subjects fill the frame, but not from a comfortable distance as previously seen through a lens the size of a baseball bat, but in-your-face-close with a wide-angle lens. But he still had to figure out a way to photograph what he saw in his mind’s eye without getting eaten.

 

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© Paul Souders

His solution was the PocketWizard Plus II Transceivers* he frequently used for triggering remote Speedlites wirelessly when shooting editorial assignments. He knew PocketWizard Plus II Transceivers could also trigger cameras, but seldom took advantage of this function. Visualizing lion cubs or bears sticking their noses inches from the front element of his camera lens while taking semi-playful swipes at it was exactly what he was after. Right then and there he added his PocketWizard Plus II radio triggers, a few small tabletop tripods, and additional sets of lithium-ion AA batteries to his packing list.
(*Note: The PocketWizard Plus II Transceiver has been replaced by the Plus III.)

Paul Souders’ new vision entailed positioning cameras with wide-angle lenses at ground level along watering holes, nesting areas, and feeding grounds. A big believer in keeping things simple, Souders was careful to keep his camera as innocuous looking as a camera with an ultra-wide angle lens and radio transceiver mounted on it can be.

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© Paul Souders

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© Paul Souders

When shooting on the plains, Souders’ typically scouts out promising camera positions, sets up his cameras – each with a PocketWizard Plus II set to its own channel, and retreats to a safe, non-confrontational distance away. Once out of the way, he sets up a second camera with a long telephoto for capturing the action from a more traditional point-of-view.

On a more recent trip to the Canadian Arctic to photograph bears catching salmon making their way upstream to spawn, Souders’ sealed his camera and lens into a waterproof housing mounted on a heavy-duty studio tripod submerged just below the waterline in order to capture the grace of these great beasts as they dive after schools of fish below the surface of the water.

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© Paul Souders

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© Paul Souders

The type of photography Paul Souders’ specializes in requires patience, perseverance, and the ability to endure punishing environments, not to mention the realities of being a potential snack for a host of predators.

Another reality is the toll these projects take on his cameras, which are often poked, pawed, mauled, sometimes trampled, and inevitably smattered with mud and/or dirt. On a recent trip to Alaska “one and a half out of seven cameras’ were functioning by the time he came home. And don’t ask him how many cameras and lenses met their demise after being crushed, chewed to bits, or knocked overboard. (Trust me… the numbers are painful – SR).

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© Paul Souders

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© Paul Souders

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© Paul Souders

 

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© Paul Souders

© Paul Souders

© Paul Souders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
The payoff for his efforts are pictures he never would have dreamed possible before he incorporated PocketWizard radio triggers into his workflow. Thanks to his PocketWizard triggering system, he now has the ability to capture penguins leapfrogging over his camera with inches to spare as they rocket out of the water onto land, or to see exactly how long and sharp a bear’s claws could be from uncomfortably-close distances and perspectives.

When Paul Souders originally purchased his first PocketWizard transceivers, they were merely a means of moving his Speedlites off his camera and out of the way. Little did he know they would some day radically change the way he views the world and photographs it.

To see more of Paul Souders’ work, check out his website.

All images, videos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and © Paul Souders all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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Cheng Han Pursues His Inner Captain Nemo

Cheng Han is the type of person who once he gets something into his head, he won’t let it go until it becomes real, at least when it comes to photography. And the funny thing is, up until not that long ago, photography for Cheng Han was merely a function of recording domestic life.

A visit to his website reveals an artist who is serious about the visual quality of his end products. His environmental studio and location portraits simply cannot be glossed over – each of his multifaceted images requires a careful once over… maybe two.

"Together"

“Together” © Cheng Han

Putting the geek and emotional sides together is the gist of Cheng Han’s photographic personality. “I’m basically a geek and the geek side of me likes puzzles. The creative side of me really enjoys producing surreal images that generate emotional responses… at least on my part, and I hope on the part of others who look at my pictures.”

Cheng is fascinated in creating technically challenging photographs, but when he decided to take his photographic odyssey underwater, he had no idea what he was getting into. (According to Cheng, his notebook contains over 200 production notes.)

At Peace

“At Peace” © Cheng Han

Right off he knew he wanted to include swaths of fabrics entwined around and/or about his models. eBay turned into a good source of fabric samples, not to mention lighting manufacturers he called on to see how their diffusion materials and backdrops would hold up underwater. He then had to see which of these fabrics were color-fast because the last thing he wanted was to tie-dye somebody’s swimming pool. (His first attempt with a red surplus parachute almost resulted in a nasty red stain along the lining of the pool ,which fortunately dissipated before Cheng had to drain clean, and refill the pool.)

Cheng Han’s goal was to create environmental portraits complete with models, make-up, costumes, backgrounds, and lights just as he would in a studio… but all partially or entirely underwater, utilizing the unique ethereal effect of weightlessness underwater in ways that cannot be replicated on land.

Cheng readily acknowledges outside influences. ‘Together’, an image of a woman wrapped in swirling silky material while floating embryo-like in a blue void of fabric and water was inspired by a scene in the movie ‘Gravity’, when Sandra Bullock enters an abandoned spacecraft and momentarily floats curled up as if she was in the womb.

To Be No More

“To Be No More” © Cheng Han

 

In a bid for camaraderie, Cheng goes below the surface with the models in all of the underwater pictures. “It wasn’t easy for anyone – take a breath, go underwater, get into position, avoid hitting the lights, pose, open eyes, focus, shoot, and resurface – all while not breathing.”

The camera and lighting part of the equation is equally challenging, the biggest problem being wireless communication between electronic flash systems positioned both below and above the waterline.

“There’s a lot of information available about underwater flash for photographing sea life and wireless flash on land, but there’s not much information about syncing studio flash above water with underwater flash simultaneously.  And then one day Jean Bruneau, the tech advisor for Aquatica, suggested I look into PocketWizards”.

In conventional underwater photography, the Ikelite underwater flash units would be hardwired to his camera’s Ikelite underwater camera housing and mounted in a series of cumbersome & heavy arms. The challenge was triggering the Elinchrom Quadra flash units that were poised above water along the flanks of the pool. Standard optical and radio remote procedures proved erratic if they worked at all.

Inversion (1)

“Inversion” © Cheng Han

Cheng’s solution was to run a hard-wired sync cord from his camera’s Ikolite flash housing up above the waterline where it was coupled to a PocketWizard Plus III Transceiver. Each Ikelite underwater flash and one of the Quadras were also individually connected to PocketWizard tranceivers via sync cords also above the waterline. The signal from the camera’s transceiver could then trigger all the lighting simultaneously. Any additional Quadras were triggered optically.

Cheng Han - Purgatory

“Purgatory” © Cheng Han

In most of the images the Elinchroms are the main lights and the underwater Ikolite flash units, which are often gelled for atmospheric effects, are for fill. In other cases, the Ikolites are the main light source and the Elinchroms are used for fill. The setup Cheng used allowed total freedom to position lighting with the same freedom you would have in a conventional studio.

Cheng Han - Carmen 01

“Carmen” © Cheng Han

Currently Cheng is trying to further push his boundaries by attempting to construct even more complex sets for use underwater with the goal of making the underwater aspect of the photographs secondary to the look and flavor of his photographs.

And a box of donuts says PocketWizard Plus III Transceivers will be an integral part of his lighting system.

To learn more about Cheng Han’s work, visit his website.

All images, videos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and © Cheng Han, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

 

 

 

 

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Dylan Coulter Photographed These Olympians Back in July

THE MAKING OF THE CITI SOCHI WINTER OLYMPIC CAMPAIGN PHOTO SHOOTClick on link for a Behind the Scenes look at the photo shoot.

Brooklyn-based photographer Dylan Coulter has made a name for himself creating iconic portraits of athletes, models, and other notables. For the past two years he has also been the person responsible for photographing the Citibank Winter Olympic Teams (last year he shot the London-bound teams, this year the Sochi-bound teams), a position he takes great pride in. “It was a real honor to be called back for a second year” says Dylan, and you can tell by the tone in his voice, he means it.

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Evan Lysacek – 2010 Olympic Gold Medalist – Figure Skating © Dylan Coulter

Unlike most Olympic photographers who had to journey to Sochi to earn their paychecks, Dylan Coulter had to make his magic in a four day window of time about seven months earlier in the New York metropolitan area. His original plan was to take the athletes to venues that at the very least approximated the appearance of the sports each of the athletes excelled at, but due to the logistics of shooting the entire team in a short window of time, that idea was nixed. So it was off to the studio.

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Billy Demong – 2010 Olympic Gold Medalist – Nordic Combined © Dylan Coulter

Rather than build elaborate sets or shoot against backdrops that somehow suggest the type of sports the athletes participate in, Dylan decided to go bare-bones by shooting each of them against white backgrounds. Some images with little more than strips of gaffers tape on the floor for positioning purposes. Dylan also shot portraits of each of the athletes close-up and full-body for other applications in the Citibank campaign.

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Dan Jensen – 1994 Olympic Gold Medalist – Speed Skating © Dylan Coulter

Perhaps the strongest and most difficult photographs he captured were the simulated multiple exposure sequences, a style he originated on a project for ESPN Magazine. Unlike traditional multiple exposure pictures in which a single movement is captured at set intervals on the same exposure, Coulter’s simulated multiple exposure sequences are made up of individual posed images that are lit and composed one at a time and pieced together in post production.

Ted Ligety - 2014 Olympic Gold Medalist - Alpine Skiing  © Dylan Coulter

Ted Ligety – 2014 Olympic Gold Medalist – Alpine Skiing © Dylan Coulter

If it seems like a demandingly complex workflow, you’re right, but the final images are stunningly perfect at each stage of the final photograph. “Getting the form right was a big challenge, and the athletes were real troopers and performed as professionals” as they went through their paces, often repeatedly. The athletes also served as consultants in a sense when they reviewed the images, making sure each frame captured the proper form, attitude, and body English.

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Julie Chu – 2002, 2010, 2014 Olympic Silver Medalist – Women’s Ice Hockey – © Dylan Coulter

Dylan Coulter views the athletes he was hired to photograph like he views other photographers and others who practice crafts that require training and discipline, “It’s always exciting to see the differences in form between athletes, the way they run, pitch, serve a ball, there side arms, overhand, and I try to represent each of these professional athletes authentically.”

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Julie Chu – 2002, 2010, 2014 Olympic Silver Medalist – Women’s Ice Hockey – © Dylan Coulter

“My PocketWizard Plus III remote triggers were instrumental in getting me through this assignment. They didn’t only trigger the lights, but in several shots they triggered an overhead camera we rigged for some birds-eye view photographs we shot. I know it’s been said before, but being able to work wirelessly makes life so much easier.”

To see more of Dylan Coulter’s photographic work visit his website or Facebook page.

All images, videos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and © Dylan Coulter, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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For Drew Gurian it’s not just Rock and Roll

imgresFor Drew Gurian, it’s not just rock and roll – it’s what he does for a living.  Though he doesn’t currently play in a rock band (He was  a drummer in a Philadelphia-based rock band for almost seven years), he’s made a name for himself photographing many well-known bands on the road as well as in the studio.

Based in New York City, a town in which if you specialize in portraiture you better have a specialty and be good at it, Drew Gurian’s niche for the last decade has been in the music and entertainment industry. 

 

Backstage portrait of 'Soulive', a NYC-based soul/funk band (Nikon D800, 24-70 f2.8 lens, Elinchrom Ranger, Elinchrom 74" Octabank, triggered by a Pocket Wizard Plus II

Backstage portrait of ‘Soulive’, a NYC-based soul/funk band
(Nikon D800, 24-70 f2.8 lens, Elinchrom Ranger, Elinchrom 74″ Octabank, triggered by a PocketWizard Plus II)

 

To date Drew has photographed over 300 artists and musicians on and off-stage for a variety of editorial and commercial clients including Rolling Stone, The New York Times, and Red Bull. His work has also appeared in PDN, Billboard, Bass Player, Kerrang!, USA Today, and other domestic and international publications as a contracted photographer for the Associated Press.

Candid portrait of former Dispatch singer/solo artist, 'Pete Francis', Solo Artist & former member of 'Dispatch' (Leica M Type 240, 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Lastolite 24" Joe McNally Ezybox triggered by a Pocket Wizard Plus II)

‘Pete Francis’, Solo Artist & former member of ‘Dispatch’
(Leica M Type 240, 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Lastolite 24″ Joe McNally Ezybox, PocketWizard Plus II)

 

More than a stage shooter, many of Drew Gurian’s best images were captured in studio settings or outdoors under controlled lighting conditions. Even when photographing live performances, Gurian takes the time and effort to make sure the lights are just right and everything goes as planned.

Dubai recording artist 'Fatiniza' (Leica M Monochrom, 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Lastolite 24" Joe McNally Ezybox triggered by a Pocket Wizard Plus II)

Dubai recording artist ‘Fatiniza’
(Leica M Monochrom, 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Lastolite 24″ Joe McNally Ezybox, PocketWizard Plus II)

 

Capturing the action from more than one angle at a live event requires planning and experience, and after a five-year stint as first assistant to world-renowned photographer Joe McNally, Drew has learned a thing or two about getting the job done under the most challenging conditions. (He once shot a studio portrait of a major rock band in 18-seconds flat!)

'DJ Jay Daniel', Brooklyn, New York Leica M Type 240), 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Westcott shoot-through umbrella, Pocket Wizard Plus II

‘DJ Jay Daniel’, Brooklyn, New York
(Leica M Type 240, 35mm f/2 lens, Nikon SB900 Speedlight, Westcott shoot-through umbrella, PocketWizard Plus II)

 

Gurian is personable, which enables him to better connect with his subjects and develop their trust, which goes a long way when you shoot portraits for a living. This comfort level is reflected in many of the casual and more formal portraits in his portfolio.

Depending on the assignment, Gurian’s choice of lights range from Nikon Speedlights to Rosco LEDs, to Profoto and Elinchrom studio lights. Same can be said for his camera choices, which are currently the Leica M (Type 240) rangefinder, and Nikon’s D4 and D800. Regardless of which lights and cameras he’s using, Drew Gurian always packs his PocketWizard Plus IIs and Plus IIIs.

Unlike press photographers who are typically restricted to shooting the first three songs from the photo pit, Drew strives for full access to the venue, which enables him to secure secondary cameras to one or more positions above, to the side, or anywhere around the stage for that matter.Time permitting, his unlimited access makes it possible to test his lights and cameras before the lights dim and the show begins.

The three images below show Gurian setting up during a 2011 Dispatch Reunion Tour show. In addition to matching Nikon D3s  bodies at his side in the photo pit, he also secured a remote camera onto a vertical lighting truss off to the right side of the stage to simultaneously capture secondary wide-field images of the action. To ensure all three cameras worked in concert with one another, each were  equipped with PocketWizard Plus II Transceivers.

Securing remote cameras in place at one of the stops on the 2011 Dispatch Reunion Tour. Nikon D3s, 14-24 f/2.8 lens, Pocket Wizard Plus III (visible in Drew's right hand)

Securing remote cameras in place at one of the stops on the 2011 Dispatch Reunion Tour.
(Nikon D3s, 14-24 f/2.8 lens, PocketWizard Plus II (visible in Drew’s right hand)

Both cameras I had with me in the photo pit had PocketWizard Plus III's mounted on them, so every time I took a photo, the camera I mounted on-stage was also triggered. Nikon D3s, 24-70 f/2.8 lens

Both cameras I had with me in the photo pit had PocketWizard Plus II’s mounted on them, so every time I took a photo, the camera I mounted on-stage was also triggered.

As Gurian captured shot from the photo pit, the PocketWizard-equipped remote camera that Drew mounted onto a vertical lighting truss earlier captured secondary wide-field stills of the same scene. If you look in the photo pit, just in front of the band, you can actually see me taking that last photo. Nikon D3s, 14-24 f/2.8 lens, Pocket Wizard Plus III

As Gurian captured the shot from the photo pit, the PocketWizard-equipped remote camera that he mounted onto a vertical lighting truss earlier, captured secondary wide-field stills of the same scene. If you look in the photo pit, just in front of the band, you can actually see me taking that last photo.
(Nikon D3s, 14-24 f/2.8 lens, PocketWizard Plus II)

 

As you can tell from the pictures, everything worked as planned.

Partly as a result of his shooting successes over the past decade, Drew has had several speaking engagements, and has taught workshops in the US, Asia, and the Middle East.Aside from the fun-factor of meeting new faces and interacting with others in the field, these seminars have given him an opportunity to mentor others as others have mentored him in the past.

To see more of Drew Gurian’s work visit his website. 

 All images, videos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and ©Drew Gurian, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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BTS: Brandon Lyon & Pentatonix

Hello, my name is Brandon Lyon, I am a commercial portrait and fashion photographer. I work out of Dallas, Texas and I am excited to write my first article for the PocketWizard Blog. I grew up as an only child so I mostly lived inside my imagination, creating stories and characters to entertain me. I also really enjoyed reading. I craved the feeling of falling into a book for hours on end and losing yourself to a different time and place. We didn’t travel much so this was how I got away. I particularly loved science fiction and fantasy. The world was what you wanted it to be, and the rules could be different.

I wanted to share a recent project I shot for the musical group Pentatonix. They are an a cappella group of five vocalists that gained success after winning season three of NBC’s The Sing-Off and are currently dominating YouTube and the world with their fresh and unique arrangements of mainstream music from pop to hip-hop and electronic music.

Photo: © Brandon Lyon

Photo: © Brandon Lyon

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Making Waves, 22 November 2013

Making Waves is a weekly round-up of current posts featuring PocketWizard products.making_waves_logo

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Photographer Sasha Leahovcenco, gives an in depth look into his travels to those who have never had their photo taken, “from the end of the Earth” – Siberia.  He took along his PocketWizard Plus II radios and put them to work in -38° C.  Check out the incredible environmental portraits and the behind the scenes video that brings you along for the journey.

 

Rob Grim

F-Stoppers recently covered Rob Grimm, in this Behind The Scenes look at building sandwich towers.  Grimm, uses PocketWizard Plus II radios in his Chicago Studio to create compelling and eye-questioning advertising campaigns.

 

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Photographer Martin Schoeller recently did some work for TIME for their Dudes of Food series and gives a behind the scenes look of the shoot. Three famous chefs gathered for the shoot and Schoeller decided he wanted to infuse some humor in the “hunter-gather inspired and informed kitchens” the chefs run. He used his Plus III radios to help capture some creative and humorous images.


With sports seasons ramping up all over the world, we came across a blog post that will help all of you sports shooters out there: 
Securely mounting your remote cameras either behind the backboard or above the rafters of a stadium, and making sure they don’t go anywhere, is a top priority for sports shooters. Dak Dillon wrote a straightforward blog post, Simple Guide to Mounting a Remote Camera that is a great resource for any sports shooter interested in using remote camera.  *Attention sports shooters, be sure to check out our current Photo Of the Month contest which is focused on shooting sports.  Submission period ends 12/15/2013.

 

All videos, photos, and quotes in this post are used with permission and copyrighted by the photographers featured, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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Limited Edition Pink PocketWizard Plus III up for Auction

One of only 20 pink Plus III PocketWizard radio triggers made for Bob Carey's Tutu Project and The Carey Foundation. Photo ©Bob Carey

One of only 20 pink Plus III PocketWizard radio triggers made for Bob Carey’s Tutu Project and The Carey Foundation. Photo ©Bob Carey

One more of only twenty limited edition “Tutu Pink” PocketWizard Plus III transceivers is now available at auction. This Plus III, number five of twenty, will be hand-numbered and signed by photographer Bob Carey of The Tutu Project.

The PocketWizard Plus III Transceiver, in “Tutu Pink” is a very limited edition batch of just twenty radios. In addition to the Pink plastics, the LED backlight of the LCD screen is also pink. The Plus lll is an Auto-Sensing Transceiver, which means it will automatically switch between transmit and receive as needed and is reverse-compatible with all PocketWizard radios, making it the perfect addition to existing gear.

All proceeds from the auction go to support the Carey Foundation, a 501c nonprofit organization which directly assists families suffering from breast cancer with daily needs such as transportation to doctor appointments, childcare, meals in homes, etc.

Once these twenty Tutu Pink Plus III radio triggers are sold for charity, no others will be manufactured. They’re destined to become photographic collectors’ items.

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What’s That For, PocketWizard? Plus III Half-Press Function

Hi, this is Patrick.  I’m the PocketWizard Tech Support Manager and I’ve been with the company a long time … longer than anyone, actually, but I’m the only one counting.    When asked to write an article for the PocketWizard Blog which would be featured in the Newsletter, I thought, “Suh-weet!  The eyes of millions will ogle my every proclamation!  I’ll wear swanky shirts!  I’ll be even more famous!  Maybe even go on a date!”  But then I was told that I’m not actually famous, my $6 T-shirts are not swanky, and I’d get an article near the bottom if there were 8 or 9 pixels left over on the internet somewhere.  “Meh.  It could be worse,” I thought, “I could be fixing the plumbing again.”  No mention was made about dating, so call me, maybe?

Plus III - Half Press

Click for larger – look for blue circle

Lots of folk know that the Plus III can trigger remote cameras.   What they don’t know is that the TEST button on the Plus III is two-stage, just like a camera!  With the right cable (I’ll explain that in a moment) you can half-press the remote camera before the exposure just like you would when using the camera in your hands.   Wake up that grumpy camera, get the sleepy seeds out of its eyes, and let it focus and meter before it takes the shot. This feature works on Channels 17 and higher.  It’s mentioned briefly on Page 7 of the Plus III Quick Guide, but novels could be written on this subject (budding novelist = date-worthy!).

Some remote camera aficionados will say, “Manual all the way, baby!  Fix that focus and tape that lens!”  That works for some scenarios, especially indoor sports with a sweet spot, but lots of event photography is more dynamic than that.  Maybe you want beaucoups bokeh so auto-focus for wide apertures is critical.  Maybe the lighting is changing a lot and you need the camera to manage the exposure.  Maybe you want more control for self-portraits.  Or maybe you simply want to impress your date with remote techno-wizardry!  Just like hand-held photography, you can see the moment approaching and you choose when to half-press the shutter release, making sure the camera’s little robot brain has enough time to do its thing.

Now most remote cameras will still get the metering right, and possibly achieve autofocus, without this cool half-press feature.  But it just doesn’t feel the same, and our photographer brains appreciate the half-press familiarity.

Tip: Jump to 32 minutes the above webinar for a video demonstration or click here!

To pull this off, you need a certain kind of remote camera cable for your Plus III: you need an –ACC cable.  I apologize for this bizarro cable naming scheme – there is a long and boring explanation, and it’s mostly my fault, but that’s not important right now.  Our Cable Finder will help you find the correct –ACC shutter release cable for your camera.  They have a stereo miniphone connection on them, like a headphone plug for your Walkman, not a mono plug like your great-grandfather’s chest-pack hearing aid  (hipster talk = guaranteed date?)

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Click on image to visit our easy-to-use Cable Finder

While you are picking up one of these cables, get two!  With one on your remote camera and one on the camera in your hands, the remote camera will follow along with you.  As you press the button on your camera half-way, the remote camera will do the same thing.  When you press all the way, both cameras will trigger.  It’s like that moment on a first date when you both reach for the check.  So cute!

Watch the Mark Wallace video and you’ll get it.  Visit our wiki for a detailed list of instructions.  Connect with us if you need more help.  Friend me on Facebook if you want to hang out or something.

Patrick Clow,
Technical Support Manager

Patrick Clow, Technical Support Manager @ PocketWizard

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Plus III Takes Home a Pop Award!

Pop Awards

popphoto.com

Popular Photography has released their list of the best gear from 2012 and we’re happy to say that the our newest transceiver, the PocketWizard Plus® III, has earned a spot on it.

They write:

“All year, we put photo gear through its paces: we test it, use it, manhandle it. When we’re through, we make a list of the top items we’ve tried and tested. Then we cross off most of the list. The remaining items receive top honors: The POP Award for Photography’s Outstanding Products.”

Check out the list on Pop Photo to see the Plus III rubbing shoulders with other distinguished photo gear from lenses to backpacks and everything in between.

 

All images and quotes in this post are used with permission and ©Pop Photo, all rights reserved; story is ©PocketWizard. Please respect and support photographers’ rights. Feel free to link to this blog post, but please do not replicate or repost elsewhere without written permission.

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Scott Markewitz Captures a Double Backflip

We’ve profiled action sports photograph Scott Markewitz before. We’re happy to see he’s still getting amazing shots. While shooting for Red Bull, he documented a mountain biking first. Here’s Paul’s own report of the event, along with some of his photos.

Paul Basagoitia Double Back Flip 02.04.2012

Paul Basagoitia Double Back Flip 02.04.2012 ©Scott Markewitz

Recently I was on a shoot in southern Utah with a Red Bull crew, there to capture Paul Basagoitia’s attempt at the first-ever double back flip on a mountain bike in natural terrain. I’ve worked with Paul many times and was excited to be there to photograph his attempt. If anyone could pull it off, it was Paul.

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