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Simon Gerzina on the Right Frequency

“I’ve been relying on PocketWizards for every assignment I do,” says fashion and portraiture specialist Simon Gerzina. “I have two or three PocketWizard Plus models and two or three Plus II’s. They’ve been great. The only problem I’ve ever had with them is shooting in larger studios to find other photographers using them on the same frequency. That’s a testament to their popularity and reliability. All pros and serious shooters use them.”

©Simon Gerzina

“When I first started shooting I had bought cheaper, low-end gear. I was constantly battling strobe misfires and lack of fires where someone’s walkie-talkie in a hotel would straddle the same frequency my triggers were using. My strobes would go haywire. After all those classic problems over the years, it made no sense to keep using those. I bought my first pair of Pluses probably seven years ago, and there was no reason to go back.”

©Simon Gerzina

“When you’re in the position of having to rely on your gear—when you have the assumption it’s going to work all the time—there’s no other choice out there. PocketWizard is synonymous with radio trigger photography for a good reason.”

Gerzina also uses a Mamiya RB67 a Mamiya 645AF, Profoto Acute2 and AcuteB strobe packs, and Sekonic L-358 meters.

Simon Gerzina Photography

Simon Gerzina’s Twitter feed

Simon Gerzina’s Facebook Fan Group

Fashion Shoot with Ford Models

Simon Gerzina’s Flickr Photostream

Behind-the-Scenes on Flickr

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Mark Wallace Takes Miami

Mark Wallace recently made the Miami stop on his Mark Wallace US Meetup Tour. Held at MAPS Studios, Mark put a wide variety of PocketWizard and related gear through its paces.

Mark posted this on his blog after leaving town, and put together the following clip of highlights from his time in Miami.

Looks like a good and educational time was had by all!

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Jason Reed, Witness to History

Jason Reed doesn’t have one thing most photographers have: his own Web site. He has no need for one. We see his images every day. Jason Reed has one thing most photographers would trade all their gear for, even for one day. Reed is a seven year veteran of the White House Traveling Pool, and has been shooting for Reuters for twenty years.

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters. Note remote camera with PocketWizard on floor against shrubs.

News photography fans and much of the public will recall some of Reed’s memorable images, such as George W. Bush bumping chests with a new graduate at the Merchant Marine Academy, or Karl Rove rapping at the Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association dinner, or Barack Obama shedding a tear over the death of his grandmother on the eve of the election he was to win. What really got the attention of photography fans was his “White House Moments: A Time-lapse View,” created after a video editing course got him interested in time-lapse movies. In it, he documents a day at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, from the West Wing to the East Room to the Rose Garden to the South Lawn. This is the White House as you’ve never seen it before. 8000 exposures later, PocketWizards proved critical to the project.

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

“The PocketWizard is something we’ve been using at the White House since they’ve been around,” says Jason. “I use the MultiMAX Transceivers. I can’t imagine working without them. They’re so easy to use. I can put multiple cameras at different angles all on the same frequency and trigger them as either motor drive sequences or using the intervalometer, which are really easy to set up from the menu. You can shoot a picture every three seconds, five seconds, ten seconds, and you can change those settings pretty quickly.”

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Australian-born Reed began a Bachelor’s degree in Photography in Sydney. The first day he showed up to discover just one class was unavailable: his photography class. This unfortunate event was the loss of higher education and the gain of the news photography industry. Soon he was able to get a job at Reuters hand-printing color film to 8 x 10 format and loading prints onto analog drum transmitters. That led to some photographer-mentors encouraging his talent, supplementing a two-year technical course in Photography at a local college. Then began Reed’s Forrest Gump-like professional life of being present at world events as they unfolded. In 1994 at age 23, he moved to Hong Kong, which was the Reuters regional headquarters at that time. He served there as an editor and photographer until the handover to China in 1997. Moving on to the new headquarters in Singapore, Reed was dispatched around the region to cover earthquakes, plane crashes, and civil unrest in Asia. From 1999 until 2002 he used Bangkok, Thailand as a base from where he travelled to Pakistan to cover the 2001 war against the Taliban and Indian natural disasters, among other news stories.

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters. Note remote cameras with PocketWizards on floor at right.

Presidential visits to the region drew his interest. President Clinton went to Vietnam, India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Reed lent support to Reuters White House photographers who travelled with the President wherever he went. The young photographer found himself caught up in the energy of being in the entourage of the Leader of the Free World, as the old cliché goes. He dreamed of doing it full-time, and in 2003 a position opened up, and Jason Reed became a Reuters photographer at the White House.

Although situated at the White House, the road didn’t stop calling him. Reed covered the 2004 Bush campaign and he spent the last two years on the road following the Obama campaign to victory from before the Illinois junior Senator’s announcement to run in February of 2007. He finds what he’s learned in the capital is applicable outside it. “Shooting every day at the White House is challenging. You constantly try to find something new. Those skills you take away to any other assignment and look for something new, something you wouldn’t be looking for if you hadn’t worked at the White House. Trying to make things subtly new day after day for years and years teaches you to be a better photographer. The PocketWizard is an extension of that. When I travel to events I see where I can put multiple cameras. I’m always looking for a key moment of a historical event, such as the signing of an important act of Congress, or a bilateral meeting with a foreign head of state. As a photographer you try to find multiple angles of everything. You’re working harder, but the reward is you’re getting more angles, better pictures and better moments. The PocketWizard frees me up to look at different things and execute them really easily.”

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Although shooting at the same address, Reed isn’t about to get bored. “History shows us anything can happen at any time,” he says. Occasionally he’ll be photographing the President at a graduation ceremony, looking through the viewfinder for hours at a time, careful to never miss a moment. “If there’s anything this job teaches you, it’s about being ready.”

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Reed also has to be ready for other assignments. He covered the last Academy Awards ceremony, and was full of quips pointing out the difference between photographing politicians and celebrities. “They say Washington is Hollywood for ugly people, and Hollywood is Washington for beautiful people,” jokes Reed. “I like to do different events like the Olympics or Formula One races — something different to mix it up.”

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, however, remains the location of his dream job, as it would be for countless photographers around the world. “At the White House, it’s full HMI (hydrargyrum medium-arc iodide) light. There’s a whole group of television lighting technicians dedicated to lighting every event. We’re really blessed with the ability to walk in and shoot an indoor event at 400 ISO at 250ths of a second at f/2.8 or 320ths at f/2.8. It’s fantastic. This is the center of the universe of making things look good.” For this, our leaders and candidates are grateful, and viewers around the world wait for the next click of Jason Reed’s shutter while working at his dream job.

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Photo by Jason Reed, ©Reuters

Jason Reed at Reuters

Bush Years: Defining his Presidency

Riding with Obama — A Final Look Back

White House Moments: A Time-lapse View

Reuters Photo Blog

Reuters News Pictures Official Site

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Fletcher Family and Space Shuttle

The Strobist recently featured Florida shooter Jon M. Fletcher’s portrait of his family enjoying a night launch of the Discovery. Fletcher used PocketWizards to shoot his family after three 30-second exposures without strobes to capture the launch.

©Jon M. Fletcher

©Jon M. Fletcher

http://www.jonmfletcher.com/

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PocketWizards Among the Redwoods

The October issue of National Geographic features photographer Michael “Nick” Nichols and a team of researchers and technicians documenting the condition of America’s remaining virgin Redwood forests. Page 128 has a photo of PocketWizards in action. This page on their site features an amazing video of the rig with six PocketWizards they hoisted 90 meters into the giant trees.

©National Geographic

©National Geographic

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Rick Denham's Lighting, Saturation, and Hockey

Rick Denham’s Lighting, Saturation, and Hockey

Located in Ontario, Canada, Rick Denham likes to break rules. Like many young Canadian men, Rick was once a hockey player. He now finds himself either shooting photos from the other side of the plexiglass, or away from ice rinks altogether as he builds his reputation as a wedding photographer of note.

RickDenham623374471_WGZVU-O

© Rick Denham

Although photographing sports of all kinds gives him thrills, working as an in-demand wedding photographer pays the bills. Sample photos from the latter category prove there’s no lack of emotion or technique in his deeply saturated and outstandingly composed shots. Shooting primarily in a photojournalism style, Rick still delivers photos with wedding parties positioned in ways which would’ve made many Renaissance painters weep with envy. Prospective customers intrinsically know this, and are often fooled by the end result.

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

“When a bride and groom meet with me, I always hear, ‘We want candid photography, we want journalism photography,'” he reports. “The first thing I have to explain to them is ‘most of these shots are set-up.’ It has to be set-up. You can’t get a candid group shot of twenty people and expect it to not be set-up.” A rule-breaker at heart, Rick believes whatever feels natural is the best approach. He encourages wedding parties to behave naturally as he shoots, until it comes time for some informal positioning used in his trademark group shots.

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

Attracted to low-stress situations, Rick loves the digital revolution and the benefits of shooting more exposures with more cameras, including remotely-fired cameras, which continue to play a growing part in his work.

RickDenham623375122_3rYfe-M

© Rick Denham

Along with composition, Rick’s saturation is one of the hallmarks of his photography. “I bump my saturation up in my cameras, especially at weddings. Weddings, to me, are colorful. People like color. They pay to have lots of flowers. Even in classic weddings, that’s what I like to see. Even in my black and whites, I like to see a lot of contrast. I like my blacks black.”

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

Multiple lights and cameras are part of Rick’s arsenal. He typically carries four Canon 580EX II Speedlites, three MultiMAX units, three PocketWizard Plus IIs, and a 16-35mm wide angle lens, which he always keeps on one of his two Canon Mark III’s. In addition, a softbox, Honl grids and snoots, and two light stands are at the ready on most shoots. He also brings a Magic Arm and Super Clamp. Often these are employed low to the ground, where he says, “no one thinks of using them there.”

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

© Rick Denham

There are a few subject areas Rick has plans to branch out into, along with corresponding business plans. Although we’re unable to divulge details at this time, we can be sure Rick will be bringing his sense of composition, rich tones, and PocketWizard gear to these new endeavors.

Rick’s blog: http://rickdenhamphoto.blogspot.com/

Rick Denham Photography: http://www.rickdenham.com/

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Jamey Price and His Racing Rig

Charlotte, North Carolina-born Jamey Price has a lot on his plate. Currently in his senior year at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, Jamey is a History and International Relations major. Competing as a steeplechase jockey, a triathlete, a varsity college swimmer, and a cyclist, Jamey finds himself drawn to the emotion in sports. At a recent summer internship with the Charlotte Observer, Jamey fused his passion for athletics and photography.

On assignment to cover a local protest by Iranian-Americans voicing their displeasure with the Iranian government, Jamie was personally moved by one individual. A protesting woman thanked him personally for helping raise awareness to her cause and the plights of millions. Although extremely emotional and gratifying, the downsides to this type of photojournalism include protestors angry at having their photos taken. Jamey found a sweet spot in photojournalism when covering sporting events. The intensity of emotion, struggle, endurance, and his own love of a sports challenge all came together when sent to cover races of various kinds. “There’s emotion in beating someone in sports. There’s artistic talent in it. Everyone is charged,” he says.

jameyprice4

©Jamey Price

Jamey’s photography and sports were fused at the 2.8-mile Booty Loop in Charlotte. The 24 Hours of Booty is the only 24-hour cycling race in the country. Many riders log more than 250 miles benefitting the Lance Armstrong Foundation and local cancer charities. This year, Jamey had a stroke of genius with the idea of building a rig to photograph the event from his own bicycle. His materials consisted of

jameyprice2

©Jamey Price

jameyprice1

©Jamey Price

Jamey’s blog provides details about his rig. “Nothing about the bike experiment was staged,” reports Jamey. “These are candid, natural shots which happened within the action of the race.” The impressive results have caused other photographers to clamor for information on building similar rigs for themselves. “No one to my knowledge has done a non-staged photo essay from mounted on the back of a bike.” As his photos prove, Jamey’s rig enabled him to photograph the event looking both forward and backward, documenting riders from different angles in 672 exposures.

Nothing broke on his homebuilt rig. With one PocketWizard in his hand, the other PocketWizard was mounted on the hotshoe of the D200. It came off once while biking at about 25 miles per hour. After pulling over, stopping traffic, and retrieving it, the PocketWizard still functioned perfectly. Aside from a small amount of paint coming off his beloved training bike, the entire rig was removed without permanent damage. “It’s a durable product, definitely,” declares Jamey of his PocketWizard.

jameyprice3

©Jamey Price

With his internship at The Charlotte Observer over, Jamey now has his sights set on a career as a professional photographer. Although protests and disasters may not be his events of choice, documenting the hardship and glory of competitive sports will likely be found in his viewfinder after graduation.

Blog: jameyprice.wordpress.com

Web site: www.jameypricephoto.com

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Remote Camera Control

Views: 3692
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Time: 01:20 More in Howto & Style

It's that Time of Year…

©Mark Rebilas 

 

©Mark Rebilas

 

You know, best songs of 2008, best books of 2008, best….whatever. Mark Rebilas, no stranger to the PocketWizard blog, has put together “Best Random Sports Photos of 2008” and they’re creative, powerful and even funny. Not all the photos needed remote control of camera or strobe, but it’s well worth the visit noneteless.

Link

Happy Holidays!

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YOUNG MAN, YOU’RE GETTING 2 TO 22…F/STOPS THAT IS

Kevin Eddy got himself into the NM Penitentiary, but alas, it was abandoned. What’s a photographer to do? Well, in Kevin’s case he pulled out his trusty strobe with a PocketWizard attached and set up a downright eerie shot . On the Flickr site, you’ll also see how other photographers rated the shot (a ten out of ten, it seems). Check it out here. Well done!

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